I embrace the past with the future in mind. That's what living in the present moment means to me.


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Reblogged from indiohistorian  24 notes

Woe to the Revolution when the day comes, when the people, overburdened by contributions and consumed by abuses, turn to their enemies for salvation! By Apolinario Mabini (1864-1903), the first Prime Minister of the Philippines, from his article “Supreme Court of Justice,” August 28, 1899 (via indiohistorian)

Reblogged from socimages  333 notes
socimages:

A reluctant defense of sunscreen for men.
By Lisa Wade, PhD
Lotion is socially constructed as feminine and so some men, attempting to avoid the prevailing insults of our time – gay, fag, bitch, pussy, douche, girl, and woman – are disinclined to use it.
Eeeew, lotion!
You know who you are, guys.
Sunscreen is a category of lotion and so putting on sunscreen is equivalent to admitting you’re the sun’s bitch.  Men are supposed to let the sun bake their face into a tough, craggy masculinity that says “yeah, I go outdoors and, when I do, I don’t give a shit.”
Because caring about one’s health is for pussies, some scholars argue that being male is the single strongest predictor of whether a person will take health risks.  In fact, thanks in part to the stupid idea that lotion carries girl cooties, men are two to three times more likely to be diagnosed with skin cancer.
So, fine dudes, here’s some sunscreen for men.  For christ’s sake.
Thanks to @r0setayl0r and @ryesilverman for sending along the product!  Check it out on our truly humorous pointlessly gendered products Pinterest board.
Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the co-author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

socimages:

A reluctant defense of sunscreen for men.

By Lisa Wade, PhD

Lotion is socially constructed as feminine and so some men, attempting to avoid the prevailing insults of our time – gay, fag, bitch, pussy, douche, girl, and woman – are disinclined to use it.

Eeeew, lotion!

You know who you are, guys.

Sunscreen is a category of lotion and so putting on sunscreen is equivalent to admitting you’re the sun’s bitch.  Men are supposed to let the sun bake their face into a tough, craggy masculinity that says “yeah, I go outdoors and, when I do, I don’t give a shit.”

Because caring about one’s health is for pussies, some scholars argue that being male is the single strongest predictor of whether a person will take health risks.  In fact, thanks in part to the stupid idea that lotion carries girl cooties, men are two to three times more likely to be diagnosed with skin cancer.

So, fine dudes, here’s some sunscreen for men.  For christ’s sake.

Thanks to @r0setayl0r and @ryesilverman for sending along the product!  Check it out on our truly humorous pointlessly gendered products Pinterest board.

Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the co-author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

Reblogged from gay-romance  73 notes
gay-romance:

Robin, thank you for all the joy and laughter you have released upon the world! I only wish you were here to help wipe the tears of all of us who are mourning. We love you so! I will forever remember you, and will try with all my might to seize the day! Carpe diem!

gay-romance:

Robin, thank you for all the joy and laughter you have released upon the world! I only wish you were here to help wipe the tears of all of us who are mourning. We love you so! I will forever remember you, and will try with all my might to seize the day! Carpe diem!

Reblogged from catalinadetrastamara  119 notes

daughter-of-castile:

Isabella of Portugal (1503 - 1539)

Isabella (1503 - 1539) was the second child and eldest daughter of King Manuel I of Portugal and his second spouse, Infanta Maria of Castile and Aragon. She was named after her maternal grandmother, Isabella I of Castile, and her aunt Isabella, Princess of Asturias, who had been her father’s first spouse.

Isabella was second-in-line to the throne until the birth of her brother Louis in 1505. However, as the oldest daughter of Manuel I of Portugal, she was a rather attractive party. She married her first cousin, Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor, the son of Joanna of Castile and Philip the Handsome, Duke of Burgundy, who as Holy Roman Emperor, King of Spain, Archduke of the Habsburg dominions, titular Duke of Burgundy, and ruler of the Netherlands and the Spanish empire in the Americas and the Mediterranean and Italy was one of the most powerful men of his time.

In 1521 Isabella’s father died and her brother succeeded to the throne as king John III. The marriage negotiations between the Portuguese and Spanish began almost immediately. It was agreed that the new king would marry Catherine of Austria, Charles V’s younger sister. The union between Charles and his cousin Isabella had been proposed by the parliaments of both Castile and Aragon. Charles agreed to marry the Infanta Isabella purely out of political reasons as he needed a member of the dynasty to govern Spain, Castile and Aragon during his absences. The Infanta travelled to Seville where the wedding took place on 10 March 1526 in the palace of Alcázar of Seville. With Isabella also came a huge dowry to the Spanish finances. Although it was a political union, the marriage proved to be a love-match. Records say that during their honeymoon “when are together, although there are many people around, they do not notice anyone else; they talk and laugh, and nothing else distracts them.

Isabella also proved to be a competent consort; she served as regent of Spain during her husband’s absences, between 1529–1532 and 1535–1539. She was noted for her intelligence and beauty.

Isabella died in 1539 after the birth of her sixth child. The Emperor was away at the time and her premature death affected him deeply. He never remarried, and he dressed in black for the rest of his life.

In 1547, the nobleman Francis Borgia conveyed her corpse to her burial-place in Granada. It is said that, when he saw the effect of death on the beautiful empress, he decided to “never again serve a mortal master”, later becoming a Catholic saint.

In 1580, more than 40 years after her death, her son Philip succeeded the Portuguese throne, claiming his mother’s successory rights temporarily uniting the Iberian peninsula under one crown in what would later be called the Iberian Union.

Isabella married Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor on 10 March 1526. Their children were as follows:

-Philip II of Spain (1527–1598), King of Spain and Portugal.

-John of Austria (22 March 1528 – 1530), died young.

_Maria of Austria (21 June 1529 – 26 February 1603), married her cousin Maximilian II, Holy Roman Emperor.

_Ferdinand of Austria (19 October 1535 – 20 March 1538), died young.

_Joanna of Austria (1537–1573), married her cousin Prince John of Portugal and was the mother of king Sebastian of Portugal.

-John of Austria (30 April 1539), whose birth led to the death of his mother.